Gabriel Byrne

Actor

Nationality: Irish Born: May 12, 1950

Alan Alexander Milne, better known as A. A. Milne, was an author and poet from England, who was particularly famous for being the creator of the character Winnie the Pooh. Milne was educated at the University of Cambridge and initially worked as a playwright; however it was as the writer of Winnie the Pooh in 1926 that he became famous. It was followed up by The House at Pooh Corner two year later. Other than that, he was a prolific writer who wrote children’s short story and poetry collections, newspaper columns, plays and had also been a columnist for the popular magazine Punch.
I would love to go back to any time in European history, especially in Irish history, to the second or third century, prior to the arrival of Christianity when Paganism flourished. I can always go back there in my imagination, of course. It doesn't cost anything, and it's a form of time travel, I suppose.
I think that when we look at something that's well acted and a story that's well told, it allows us to be a mirror of who we are as human beings and as a culture, and offers a glimpse of where we're headed.
The difference that a drama group or a cinema club can make to a small village or a town. It opens people up to ideas, potential about themselves that really, in a way, education often fails to. It's a way of drawing a community together.
I attended the bedside of a friend who was dying in a Dublin hospital. She lived her last hours in a public ward with a television blaring out a football match, all but drowning our final conversation.
Being listened to and being heard is an experience that doesn't happen terribly often. To listen compassionately or nonjudgmentally to another person - not to get too heavy about it - but I once heard somebody say that was a form of real prayer.
No actor who's any good can say truthfully to themselves, 'Yeah, I'm good; I've got this sorted.'
Corporations are the new dictators.
Generally speaking, I don't think people know a great deal about the Viking culture, apart from the label that is usually attached to them, either pillagers or deviants who came and brought back loot to Norway. It was an incredibly sophisticated, complex and layered culture. They had their own laws, many of which protected women.
I'm a product of my Irish culture, and I could no more lose that than I could my sense of identity.
I don't disrespect anybody who espouses a particular religion or belief - that is their own right to do that. But I think it's terribly important to look beyond the comfort that religion gives.
The Catholic Church is an innately conservative rock - they call themselves the 'rock of Peter' - and its resistance to change is, ironically, what has kept it constant throughout the ages.
Viking women were able to rule kingdoms, divorce husbands, own land; and Vikings were very progressive in terms of the rights of women.