David Rabe

Playwright

Nationality: American Born: March 10, 1940

Alan Alexander Milne, better known as A. A. Milne, was an author and poet from England, who was particularly famous for being the creator of the character Winnie the Pooh. Milne was educated at the University of Cambridge and initially worked as a playwright; however it was as the writer of Winnie the Pooh in 1926 that he became famous. It was followed up by The House at Pooh Corner two year later. Other than that, he was a prolific writer who wrote children’s short story and poetry collections, newspaper columns, plays and had also been a columnist for the popular magazine Punch.
I wrestled with my Catholicism for a long time. It took a long time to escape. It began with a sense that it was repressive, stern, judgmental. It was passionate, but it was terrifying. There were individual priests and nuns who were helpful, but the religion was cold.
I never found a professional environment that made the production of plays efficient. Teamwork is demanded, but there are very few teams.
There's no demand for a body of work, though writers will be criticized for not having produced one.
Choosing to write a play is some kind of surrender. I don't make an outline. I sit and work, and suddenly the door opens, and out it comes.
Sometimes it's learning how the play wants to function rather than imposing something on it. For me, that's the thrill in directing.
Often my characters don't know what the issues of the play are. They think they're doing one thing, but something else is actually orchestrating their lives.
My writing was liberated once I abandoned acting.