Annalee Newitz

Journalist

Nationality: American Born: 1969

Alan Alexander Milne, better known as A. A. Milne, was an author and poet from England, who was particularly famous for being the creator of the character Winnie the Pooh. Milne was educated at the University of Cambridge and initially worked as a playwright; however it was as the writer of Winnie the Pooh in 1926 that he became famous. It was followed up by The House at Pooh Corner two year later. Other than that, he was a prolific writer who wrote children’s short story and poetry collections, newspaper columns, plays and had also been a columnist for the popular magazine Punch.
We can celebrate how far we've come from our sexist past when women and men are equally represented in the pages of science fiction anthologies.
Women are being welcomed into science fiction, but it's through the back door.
Publishers often push women in a subtle way to focus on fantasy and paranormal writing.
A group of scientists wanted to find the most effective mosquito repellents. So they tested 10 different substances, including campout standbys like DEET, as well as a random choice: Victoria's Secret perfume Bombshell. Turns out the perfume is almost as good as DEET.
'The Red' is the first book in a trilogy that gained a big following as a self-published e-book, and is now out in paper from Saga. It introduces us to reluctant hero Shelley, a former anti-war activist who chooses to join the military rather than serve jail time after being arrested at a protest.
'The Red' delivers intense action, leavened by a genuinely sympathetic portrait of soldiers caught up in battles they never chose.
In the 1920s and 30s, when Radio Shack was young, a much earlier generation of nerds swarmed into these tiny shops to talk excitedly about building radios and other transmission devices. You might say that Radio Shack helped define gadget culture for four generations, from radio whizzes up to smartphone dorks.
Millions of nerdy kids who grew up in the 1980s could only find the components they needed at local Radio Shacks, and the stores were like a lifeline to a better world where everybody understood computers.
Back in the 1980s, you could learn how to add memory cards to your PC in a Radio Shack.
Radio Shack is meeting the fate of many other stores that were wildly popular in the twentieth century, including record stores, comic book stores, bookstores and video stores.
There can be problems with extended families, and it can get a little close for comfort. But for the younger generations, it's clear that this option is becoming almost as appealing as living alone.
The myth that young people should leave the nest at 18, never to return, started with iconic American Benjamin Franklin.